[11 Aug 2010 | 2 Comments | ]
Brethren Persecuted – Part 3

Part Three: The Curse of Jacques de Molay

By Stephen Dafoe

The following article was originally written for Knight Templar Magazine, the official publication of the Grand Encampment of knights Templar (USA)

In August of 1308, Pope Clement V had issued a papal bull calling for a general church council to be held at Vienne in October of 1310. The purpose of the council was to try the matter of the heinous charges levelled against the Templars by King Philip IV of France.

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Headline, Templar History »

[11 Aug 2010 | 2 Comments | ]
Brethren Persecuted – Part 3

Part Three: The Curse of Jacques de Molay

By Stephen Dafoe

The following article was originally written for Knight Templar Magazine, the official publication of the Grand Encampment of knights Templar (USA)

In August of 1308, Pope Clement V had issued a papal bull calling for a general church council to be held at Vienne in October of 1310. The purpose of the council was to try the matter of the heinous charges levelled against the Templars by King Philip IV of France.

Headline, Templar History »

[9 Aug 2010 | 3 Comments | ]
Brethren Persecuted Part 2

Part Two: Revenge Destroys Everything

By Stephen Dafoe

They spit on the Holy Cross, these Knights Templar. Not only do they deny the divinity of Christ during their reception, they do not even worship God Almighty, but a graven idol instead.

These accusations, well known to many Templars, were the words of a renegade member of the Order named Esquin de Floryan, who – according to some accounts – had been imprisoned and subsequently made his claims known to his fellow inmates out of revenge.

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[8 Aug 2010 | 2 Comments | ]
Brethren Persecuted – Part 1

By Stephen Dafoe

On 28 May, 1291 the Templars relinquished their fortified compound to the Mamlukes who had been besieging the port city of Acre for the past six weeks. The Mamlukes had actually breached the city walls ten days earlier, but the Templars were the last to leave the field, a situation that was a long-standing tradition with the Order.

The loss of Acre was not merely another crusader defeat, for the port had been home to the Templars and Hospitallers for nearly a century; having been captured by Richard the Lionheart on 12 July, 1191.

Featured, Templar Miscellania »

[17 Jun 2010 | No Comment | ]
The First Templar (Trailer)

Those who are fans of Assassins Creed will get the opportunity to battle on the other side of the field. Kalypso Media is looking to release their new game early in 2011 for PC and Xbox 360. They’ve recently released the trailer for The First Templar.

Headline, Templar History »

[17 Jun 2010 | 2 Comments | ]
The Siege of Ascalon

On 25 January 1153 the Commander of the City of Jerusalem, along with the ten knights under his command, was guarding the True Cross as an army of Templars, Hospitallers, seculars and ecclesiastics made the march toward Ascalon. The massive army arrived at the walls of the port city with as many siege towers as King Baldwin could gather for the war that lay ahead.

Ascalon was situated on the Mediterranean coast and its fortifications were like a half circle; the radius on the shoreline and the semicircle on the landside facing eastward. William of Tyre described the city as being like a basin, that sloped seaward, girded round with artificial mounds, on which were built walls, studded with towers. The stone work, according to William’s account was held together with cement, which made them very strong. There were also four gates in the circuit of the city’s walls and one wall was flanked by two high towers.

Featured, Templar Miscellania »

[15 Jun 2010 | No Comment | ]
To catch a Tudor by smallGRAND

Our friends at smallGRAND have released another of their comedic videos. This one has Henry VIII being caught in a sting operation by Dateline’s Chris Hansen, who examines renaissance sexual mores.

Featured, Modern Templars »

[11 Jun 2010 | 4 Comments | ]
Chivalry for Children Program

“Chivalry is dead.” I’ve heard that a thousand times. I’ve said it myself. You’ve probably said it, too. But thinking about it, I’ve realized that what people generally mean is “Courtesy isn’t what it used to be.” That’s a statement I can agree with. But then I still read Emily Post’s “Blue Book”, wear hats, and know enough to take them off in elevators and in the presence of ladies (defined as any woman at least 14 years old who haven’t proven that they are not ladies). In any event, that is a discussion for another time.

Chivalry is not dead. It is my contention that wherever an individual is willing to put their life, their fortune or their sacred honor on the line for someone else, Chivalry lives.